Broods Release “Don’t Feed The Pop Monster”

Broods Release “Don’t Feed The Pop Monster”

The brother-sister duo Broods have been on my radar for years… They had me hooked with 2014’s “Bridges” and then again on 2016’s “We Had Everything”. But once “Peach” was released in 2018, I knew this era of Broods would be different from what I’ve heard in the past. After being dropped by Capitol Records, the release of Don’t Feed The Pop Monster feels a bit like an FU to anyone who tore Broods down over the past couple of years.

Lead singer, Georgia Nott shed some light on this new chapter, “Our goal was to make songs that are true to us, without hiding behind any kind of façade…we worked really hard and went through a thousand different emotions in the process. The fact that we can feel so many different emotions and still make something that’s so true to us—to me that’s the most important part of this whole experience and we’re so excited to finally share this album with the world.”

Monster kicks off with the electric “Sucker”. Georgia’s wispy voice lulls you into a gorgeous alt-pop dream. Similar to an anthem we’d hear from singer Robyn , the lyrics repeat, “I’m such a sucker for everything.” Georgia references not being able to keep up with trends and what’s cool, singing, “I’ll always go back to the same old things, my Stevie and Sting.” “Sucker” is the perfect introduction to the changes about to come on the rest of this album.

“Falling Apart” sticks out with a captivating electronic sound paired with muffled vocals in all the right places. A slower back beat carries “Apart” as one of the slowest on the album while still able to keep you hooked into Broods’ ultimate musical trance. “Dust” feels like it could’ve been a Fleetwood Mac B-Side in 2019 with subtle repetitive guitars, a steady drum beat, and floating vocals (a la Stevie Nicks).

One of the most powerful tracks on the album is “Too Proud”. Caleb takes his spot as lead on this one, proving his singing ability is just as impressive as sister Georgia. “Proud” discusses depression and being too proud to express your true emotions. He sings with a punch, “Too many times that I’ve been too proud to let it out, when I feel it’s too much to handle.” Caleb said he wrote the song while experiencing depression between albums; “Last year, there was a period of time where there wasn’t anything going on, and I was just like, ‘F**k – what am I doing, why am I here? I just got really deep in my own hole. I didn’t even notice until I came out of it. That’s when I wrote it, when I was actually happier. Once you sit back and go, ‘oh, shit’, that was when I was able to reflect on how I was feeling.” Broods released the music video for “Too Proud” featuring a harrowing look into life with depression; “‘Too Proud’ is for everyone who has ever felt that stigma that mental health struggles are shameful. It’s NOT shameful… If you can relate to the feelings conveyed in this video & song please take care of yourself and don’t hesitate to reach out to someone who can help.”

This review is already way longer than I wanted it to be but I can’t help it…there are so many beautiful things to say about this album. Don’t Feed The Pop Monster ends on a euphoric note with the lullaby-esque “Life After”.

(Image via coupdemainmagazine.com)

 


 

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2019 Workout Playlist!

2019 Workout Playlist!

There’s something truly magical about updating your workout playlist for the new year. Get off your booty and get moving!!! Bump this while you do your cardio, weights, heck…maybe even Pilates! I hope you enjoy these bops as much as I do.

 


 

Cautious Clay’s “Reasons”

Cautious Clay’s “Reasons”

(Image via lab.fm)

“Reasons” feels different from any other Cautious Clay song. It’s lined with exuberant hip-hop elements; starting with a deep guitar riff then swiftly back into a rhythmic beat. Keeping his harmonic background vocals and soaring alto notes as he croons about making mistakes, changes, and being honest.

“I did it all for the no, I did it all for the no good reasons, I said it all for the need, I always knew you would change like seasons” Clay preaches on the chorus. “Reasons” is edgy and urgent, unlike the slower yet philosophical themes of Clay’s previous work.

The Brooklyn-native is working on an EP to be released early next year.

Listen to “Reasons” here:

 


 

On Repeat: “Savior” – Elley Duhé

On Repeat: “Savior” – Elley Duhé

(image via pmstudio.com)

After the success of her collaboration with EDM producer/DJ Zedd (“Happy Now”), this Alabama native continues to shows off her vocal prowess on a bonus track off her album, Dragon Mentality.

“In the dead of the night, in the heart of my chest, you hide” Duhé sings in a raspy punchy pitch. “Savior” has a heavy melodic sound to it. Hip-hop-esque backbeats and diverse vocal runs make this song as powerful musically as it is lyrically.

Poetic lyrics shed light on the meaning of saviors. Duhé spoke about the song saying, “Savior is a song about the bonds that keep us together – we save each other every day… when we can help each other we must, when we can love each other we must, we will save us in the end.”

Listen for yourself below:

 


 

Who You Need: Petit Biscuit

Who You Need: Petit Biscuit

(image via billboard.com)

WHO: Mehdi Benjelloun (Petit Biscuit)

WHERE: Rouen, France

GENRE: Tropical House

TOP SONGS: “Sunset Lover” and “Problems”

Think of a sunset, a hot shower, a cloudy fall night, a hug from your love; THAT’S Petit Biscuit. All the feels, all the love, all the coziness, and all the beauty in the world, crushed up into a musical creation you’ll never forget.

His latest singles, “Suffer” and “Safe” bring more of a pop/EDM sound to his core house elements. Singer/songwriter Skott is featured on “Suffer” singing about the joy and happiness in being alone; “I’m hanging on my own, my own, I’m going out for dinner, having whiskey on my own, I’m hanging out alone, alone.” Electric laser beams and sirens pierce through the lyrics on this track giving the melody an extra boost.

Biscuit shed some light on the making of this song; “One of my initial recordings made it into the track, that siren sounding shout at the beginning. That’s in part why it’s called ‘Suffer’, composing it helped me get over some painful moments.”

Listen for yourself: