The Weeknd Returns With “After Hours”

After listening to After Hours on repeat for a full day, I am going to try my best to put all of my wonderful thoughts into one piece. It’s been four years since The Weeknd released a full length album. Starboy put him on the map as a prominent figure in the music industry (listen to “Starboy”, “I Feel It Coming”, and “Secrets”). Now that After Hours is finally here we can fully digest this emotional roller coaster.

The Weeknd - After Hours.jpg
Image via rapcurrent.com

I admire the genre bending heard on the album. It’s not fully hip-hop, rap, R&B, or pop, it’s a little bit of everything. With 14 tracks spanning almost 4 minutes each, I’m impressed with the amount of cohesiveness we hear from track to track. Each song has one thing in common; love. The majority of this album feels like a “It’s not you, it’s me” moment in a relationship. On “Hardest To Love” we hear Abel softly sing, “I’ve been the hardest to love, it’s hard to let me go.” It’s no surprise Max Martin is a co-writer on this record (and many others), leaving his mark on that catchy pop beat. While on “Scared To Live” we hear The Weeknd sing, “I am not the man I used to be, did some things I couldn’t let you see.” Track 10 titled “In Your Eyes” follows suit with lyrics like, “I always look the other way, I’m blind, I’m blind.” Once again, we hear themes of self-realization/deprecation and even shame. The album makes you walk the long road of a relationship and you’re not sure where the road is really going. Most of After Hours is a slower tempo – reminiscent of early Abel minus the abundance of drug references and obscene slang/phrases. These tracks feel more refined and mature in a beautiful way.

Songs like “Snowchild”, “Escape From LA”, and “After Hours” have that classic The Weeknd sound with a simple yet consistent production you can almost predict beat for beat. “Save Your Tears” is a standout hit off the bat. Retro synths and synced lyrics are so addicting to sing to – this one will chart for months on end. Abel always manages to stay in the same type of vocal range and it works extremely well. He flexes his chords when he wants, but it’s always restrained in a subtle way.

Digest After Hours from top to bottom and let the love motif wash over you.

 


 

Listen to THIS this Weeknd

The Weeknd decided to give his fans a realllllllllllll nice Christmas present. Two new songs? You got it!


As if his flawless Beauty Behind the Madness album wasn’t enough, he released “Low Life” featuring Future and “Pass Dat (The Weeknd Remix)” featuring Jeremih. Both were uploaded to his SoundCloud (https://m.soundcloud.com/theweeknd) on Christmas Eve. AKA – add these to your pregame playlist folks.

future-the-weeknd-low-life
Photo/rapradar.com
“Low Life” has a deep backbeat as Future’s classic tweaked vocals spit some raps. Then The Weeknd nonchalantly croons, “I’m reppin for the low life”. The song, spanning past five minutes keeps you intoxicated from start to finish. This is past the R&B stage, and more on the hip-hop side; something The Weeknd proves he can also master.

“Pass Dat” is straight fire. The bass is unreal and The Weeknd absolute slays his verse in the sexiest way. His vocals are so unique you can’t help but want to learn every word. He truly puts Jeremih to shame with this one. This song was a banger before, but this remix takes it to another level.

The-Weeknd-Pass-Dat-Remix
Photo/rapdose.com

 

Touché to The Weeknd, for keeping the good vibes alive.

 


signature

Music Monday’s: “Prisoner”

Prisoner

Key Item: Cracked marble shirt

Key Materials: Printed leather

Shoe Situation: All white huarache nike sneakers

Accessory Must: A solid white hat

image via: billboard.com
image via: billboard.com

The Weekend already proved he can woo the world with “Earned It” and make us dance with “Can’t Feel My Face” so why not add another notch to the belt? His first released collaboration off his upcoming album Beauty Behind the Madness (coming Aug. 28) is called “Prisoner” featuring the sultry queen herself, Lana Del Rey. The Weeknd’s falsetto takes the lead on the chorus as the verses serve to be a guide on how to love; “love will always be a lesson, lets get out of its way.” The powerful bass in this song drive it to be a definite R&B hit and Lana’s easy-going verse just adds to the sex appeal of the song. Abel swoons to the song admitting he’s a prisoner to love; something Lana Del Rey knows very well. The two compliment each other musically, lyrically, and aesthetically.

Listen Below: